United States

Allied Discords: Some Considerations Regarding the Overthrow of the Rădescu Government


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 125-135
No. of Pages: 11
Keywords: , , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The author discloses British sources to demonstrate the efforts of the Foreign Office and the British representatives in Bucharest to stop the seizure of power by a Communist Government. Soviet, American and British representatives participated to the Allied Control Commission of Romania, headed by Soviets; this provided the British a clear view of Soviet interferences. Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden even though instructed British representatives in Bucharest to support Soviets due to the common war efforts, hoped to avoid the inevitable until the end of February when Soviet Union decided to impose a pro-Soviet Government despite his attempts to discuss the matter with Soviets on the terms provided by the recent Declaration on Liberated Europe, issued at Yalta. The Soviet Union succeeded in imposing the fall of the Rădescu Government because the Red Army had occupied Romania and British and United States Governments had no real means to support the cause of a neutral Romanian Government.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Managing Systemic Convergence. American Multilateral Bridge Building in Europe during the 1960s and Early 1970s


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 135-168
No. of Pages: 34
Keywords: , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Scholars have usually seen American bridge building policies in a bilateral context applied towards Eastern Europe. Equally, the discussion of modernization theories confines it to the Third World or a non-European context. The author shows that the bridge building policies pursued by the Johnson Administration had a strong multilateral and method driven dimension that led to the establishment of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA). Rooted in national security calculations, multilateral bridge building was closely connected with the social discourse on modernization and social convergence during the 1960s and 1970s. The negotiation process revealed that the American way of modernization was not endorsed by the Europeans, and thus needed bridge building also in West Europe. By applying Peter Haas’ epistemic community theory framework in the context of Benedict Anderson’s ideas on nations as imagined communities, the author asks if the failures of overcoming the Cold War in the 1960s and 1970s can be interpreted as an American overextension of both epistemic and national limits. To grasp the historical background for IIASA the analysis includes other involved multilateral organizations, the OECD, ECE and NATO.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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