the Soviet Union

The Soviet – American Clash over the Turkish Straits: the August 1946 Crisis


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 85-95
No. of Pages: 11
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: What happened in foreign relations of Turkey, at the end of the World War II is, without no doubt, one of the causes for the ex–Allies ideological conflict, later known as Cold War. My paper is focused on one important moment: the Soviet Note of August 7, 1946, regarding the Montreux Convention. There are highlighted different points of view, from the United States and Soviet Union, referring to this crisis. I try to demonstrate that, also, the 1946 crisis cannot be detached from what happened in 1945, in connection with Turkey and with the whole Balkans, where Soviet political and military power imposed its will. That event (the Strait Crisis) – often treated in a brief manner by the historians – has a double meaning: on one hand, Soviet Union failed to achieve its goals in the Straits; on the other hand, United States adopted a firmer stance into the direction of supporting Turkey, even taking into account the possibility of using force.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Melvyn P. Leffler, For the Soul of Mankind. The United States, the Soviet Union and the Cold War (New York: Hill and Wang, 2007).


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 115-117
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: One of the new approaches in the Cold War studies is the importance given to the role of ideology and culture in analyzing the decision-making process, the term ideology being largely interpreted, not only in the sense of political ideology, but also in the sense of perceptions of threats, selection of friends, evaluation of opportunities, historical memories, “ideas, norms and values”, “world view”, what people think or what meaning people gave to different things. Leffler’s book is a part of the new Cold War history, bringing new data from the Soviet and American archives and in the same time a new and fresh approach and interpretation.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Between East and West: Poland, 1980-1981


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 105-132
No. of Pages: 28
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The Second World War geopolitically divided the European continent into a democratic and free Western Europe and an oppressed and ideologically controlled Eastern Europe. The events of 1980-1981 have positioned Poland between East and West, considering the unfolding of the events (not a free protest, but not an immediate violent repression either), the emergence of an organized civil society based on the alliance between intellectuals, workers, and the church (far from the meaning of Western Europe, but unlike the homogenous, controlled society of Eastern Socialism), or the outcome (not a democratic regime, but not a Communist one-party system either).
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Cold War propaganda getting started. Soviet rhetoric in the UN Security Council during the Iran Crisis of 1946


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 143-162
No. of Pages: 20
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The need for propaganda becomes more prominent at the time of wars and other crises. During the early Cold War, the United Nations Security Council was an important arena of Great Power politics where the general aims of diplomats was to strengthen the morale of one’s own side, undermine the morale of counterparts, and perhaps above all, have neutral parties support one’s political efforts – or at least prevent them from supporting enemy efforts. The focus here is on Soviet propaganda during the Iran Crisis of 1946, which was the first case the newly constituted Security Council was faced with. When considered on the whole, the Soviet delegates’ speeches were built upon a quite clear-cut narrative plot which followed the composition of the good-versus-evil classic fairy tale. In the creation of this, the choice of methods was rather broad.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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