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sovereignty Archives – Valahian Journal of Historical Studies

sovereignty

Europeaness versus National-Communism: United Europe as a gateway to non-alignment for Ceauşescu’s régime


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 63-78
No. of Pages: 16
Keywords: , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The National-Communist regime in Romania focused on two primary objectives: a modernization program meant to overcome underdevelopment by a new wave of industrialization and an independent position in the international affairs in order to gain domestic legitimacy and protection against the Soviet control. Ceauşescu’s regime developed an entire concept on the future of Europe, based on the economical cooperation and respect for sovereignty, with the intention to gain support for its major political goals. This study examines Ceauşescu’s concept of Europe and the way he used the non-alignment rhetoric to justify its purposes. “Europe” is an ideological instrument which served for asserting international independence and for granting easy access to technological and financial gateways towards development.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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The art of compromise in diplomacy. A case study: the talks between Ceauşescu and Brezhnev during the Warsaw Treaty Organization Political Committee


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 99-111
No. of Pages: 13
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: By the beginning of the 1960s, Romania gradually left the homogeneous camp of socialist countries and, as a consequence, the country would be isolated to some extent from the ‘fraternal’ countries. Therefore, Romania had to consolidate its relations with the Western states. On the other hand, Soviet Union would permanently seek and use all possible means to bring Romania back under obedience. It is here where our articles aims at challenging some assumptions and provide some fresh explanations on the Soviet-Romanian relations. While being beyond the aims of this article to provide a complete analysis of such a complex phenomenon, it however intends to reveal some new, interesting elements, indispensable to the analysis, and to raise some questions that need further research.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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The Romanian-Hungarian bilateral relations during the long year 1968


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 51-72
No. of Pages: 22
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: During the communist period, the relations between Romania and Hungary have been influenced or determined by their particular role within the communist East-European system, especially by their relations with the USSR. The main characteristic of these relations is their continuous evolution under the influence of the international context, on the one hand, and under the influence of their traditional problems, on the other hand. The year 1968 was a special moment in the Romanian-Hungarian relations, especially political relations. Different events, starting with the Meeting in Budapest and finishing with the Czech events, showed that the political relations between Hungary and Romania were becoming tenser. Despite this, the two parts tried to continue and develop the bilateral economic and cultural relations between them. But the influence of the politics over these aspects was very deep and often the political disagreements stopped any progresses. This article aims to detail the complex picture offered by this issue and to present the main characteristics of the Romanian-Hungarian bilateral relations during the year 1968, the main disputes, old or new, between the two socialist countries in their bilateral relations, their main problems of disagreement and the way in which the negotiations were held. Its purpose is not to repeat the well known positions of Romania and Hungary about the political events of the year 1968, but to connect these events and their consequences to the bilateral Romanian-Hungarian relations, judging the facts in the light offered by some new Romanian archive materials.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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The Modern British Constitution: Reformed or Undermined?


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 177-197
No. of Pages: 21
Keywords: , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Britain has the oldest constitutional and representative system of government in the world, but it is unusual among modern states in not having a written constitution. From the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 onwards, Britain gradually developed a stable constitution that enshrined the joint sovereignty of the monarch, the House of Lords and the House of Commons, while defending the liberties of the people and making the legislature increasingly responsible to a widening electorate that eventually, by the earlier twentieth century, included all adults, male and female. Until the late twentieth century this constitution enjoyed massive support at home and was greatly admired abroad. Developments over recent decades, however, have posed serious challenges to this long established and well-supported constitution. The most important developments have been the changes made by Britain’s entry into the European Community, the growing concern about the decline in parliament’s authority, the rise of nationalist sentiment in the non-English parts of the United kingdom that have resulted in the devolution of power from the Westminster Parliament to regional legislative bodies in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and the widespread desire to democratize the composition of the House of Lords but the absence of any agreement how to do this. Many changes have been made and others contemplated but not achieved over recent decades. It is still far from clear, however, whether these changes have improved or undermined a constitution that has served Britain so well over the previous three centuries.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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