Russia

From Singing Revolution to Black Widows National Liberation Struggle versus Islamism in Chechnya and Other Eurasian Conflict Areas


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 90-122
No. of Pages: 33
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This ample study approaches the changes occuring following the Soviet breakup in the Eurasian areas where national liberation and islamism started to occupied the stage that far occupied by Soviet communism.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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From Singing Revolution to Black Widows (II) National Liberation Struggle versus Islamism in Chechnya and Other Eurasian Conflict Areas


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 127-196
No. of Pages: 70
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This ample study approaches the changes occuring following the Soviet breakup in the Eurasian areas where national liberation and islamism started to occupied the stage that far occupied by Soviet communism.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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The Quest for a Russian Identity in Europe in the late Nineteen Century


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 11-22
No. of Pages: 12
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Political Russia was a superposed structure of Russian society which posed as the latter for at least two centuries, and which modelled itself following European standards, but without creating connections with its legitimizing source. To justify its expansionist claims, the tsarist empire invoked the Byzantine legacy which it was entitled to in its opinion, especially under the circumstances of the power void in eastern European space. This first approach of the relation with Europe, where Russia claimed its position, aroused different reactions in the Russian population: integrating ones on the part of the elite that wished to embrace the European civilization heritage, and rejection at the social level, where European values were difficult to grasp due to the incipient stage of political awareness in the Russian masses.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Hanna Smith, ed. Russia and its Foreign Policy. Influences, Interests and Issues (Kikimora Publications: Helsinki, 2006), 255 pp.


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 123-127
No. of Pages: 5
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: REVIEW: Hanna Smith is a research fellow at the Aleksanteri Institute of the University of Helsinki, Finland, specialized on Russian foreign policy after 1991. She is currently working on a PhD. thesis about Russia’s relations with the international organizations during the Chechen wars. In this volume published by the Kikimora Publications, Hanna Smith gathers a great number of specialists on Russian policy analyzing the present trends and orientations in the Russian foreign policy and investigating with great insight the causes and factors that act upon the process of foreign policy making in the Russian Federation nowadays.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Victor Cădere – Head of the Military Mission in Siberia (1919-1921)


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 69-78
No. of Pages: 10
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: At the end of the First World War, there was a large number of issues that required immediate solutions, one of the most urgent being the issue of the former war prisoners’ repatriation. The Romanian State, just like the other states, had to solve its problems in due time. The true problems, though, were generated by the absence of Russia from the Paris Peace Conference. As the Russian territory was facing rather confusing circumstances due to the Civil War, finding solutions to repatriate Romanian prisoners and volunteers became mandatory. The Romanian State commissioned Victor Cădere whose Mission was to repatriate all Romanian subjects from Siberia. A young officer, Raoul Alevra, was also commissioned to assist Victor Cadere in his assignments. The repatriation of Romanian volunteers who fought on the Allied forces’ side on Russian land was planned at the Peace Conference; the plan provided that the volunteers were to board British ships. Not so fortunate was the prisoners’ fate which was exclusively in the hands of the Romanian State. Hence, the Romanian Military Mission set up a concentration unit, near Vladivostok, where all prisoners, citizens of United Romania, were admitted to be repatriated later. Within the base, the prisoners had a well scheduled programme, e.g. military drill, Romanian language classes, literacy, whereas officers attended conference on various themes such as agronomy, commerce, economics, and politics. The Mission operated until May 1921 and by that time some 5,000 people were repatriated.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Russian-East European Relations: from Tsarism to Gazprom. Conference in Cork, Ireland, May 2012


Language: English
Subject(s): Review
Page Range: 129-130
No. of Pages: 2
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Relations between Russia and its East European neighbors had always been a complex issue, in which media and policy-makers usually express a wide variety of opinions ranging from appeals for friendship and cooperation to warnings of domination and security threats. Recently, these relations have been subjected to a constructive academic debate in the Irish city of Cork, during an international conference organized by the Irish Association for Russian, Central and East European Studies and University College of Cork. The conference brought together both young researchers and senior scholars from numerous countries, especially from Central and East European institutions, and debates focused on Russia’s policies in this regions of Europe, especially in the 20th century and after. A solid input of historical background from different case studies provided for an in-depth analysis on the issues debated.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Soviet Art Criticism of American Visual Art


Language: English
Subject(s): Cultural history
Page Range: 15-33
No. of Pages: 19
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The cultural Cold War has interested a number of Western and few Russian scholars. At the same time, the problem of representation and reception of American visual art in the USSR during the 1950s to 1980s has not been thoroughly explored. The essay aims to partially fill this research gap. The official Soviet reception of American visual art might be reconstructed based upon articles in periodicals, academic journals and monographs. Numerous publications, issued between 1949 and 1991, have been used as data for this study of the rhetoric in Soviet art history and art criticism. Most of the texts analyzed here contain negative criticism of avant-garde art. However, the essay also includes some precedents of positive criticism of the works of American realist painters. Prior to analyzing the Soviet reception of American visual art, it is necessary to make a few general remarks on the character and peculiarities of Soviet art discourse.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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