Poland

La France, la petite entente et la Pologne : relations economiques et financieres de la signature du traite de Versailles a la crise


Language: French
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 31-46
No. of Pages: 16
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This paper approaches the history of the relations between France and the new or reshaped countries from East-Central Europe following the Versailles Treaty, especially as regards the economic and financial aspects and their political implications.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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L’integration de la Pologne dans a Petite Entente : cheval de Troie de la France et serpent de mer diplomatique


Language: French
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 67-93
No. of Pages: 26
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Lors de la constitution de la Petite Entente en 1920, le gouvernement français se montre défavorable à une organisation qui cherche visiblement à prendre le contre-pied des démarches du Quai d’Orsay. Mise devant le fait accompli, la politique de sécurité française doit rapidement changer son fusil d’épaule et prendre en compte le regroupement de la Tchécoslovaquie, la Yougoslavie et la Roumanie contre le révisionnisme hongrois. Mais tant au gouvernement qu’à l’état-major, de nombreux agents français sont d’avis que la Petite Entente doit s’ouvrir à des enjeux diplomatiques plus larges. Le maréchal Foch, le premier, dénonce une alliance défensive accessoire au regard du danger allemand. Dès lors, l’intégration de la Pologne à l’organisation permettrait de renforcer la défense de l’ensemble des traités de paix de 1919-1920. Ainsi, la politique polonaise de la France vis-à-vis de la Petite-Entente présente deux particularités majeures : l’adhésion ou simplement la participation de Varsovie à l’organisation est encouragée par le Quai d’Orsay qui y voit la possibilité d’arrimer cette dernière à son réseau d’alliances, la Pologne est en ce sens le cheval de Troie de la France.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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The attitude of Latvia towards the Vilnius question in the Twenties and Thirties of the 20th century


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 51-57
No. of Pages: 7
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The problem of the state affiliation of Vilnius and Vilnius region during the period between the World War I and World War II was the main reason causing discordance between Lithuania and Poland and not allowing these neighbouring states to develop normal relations. This problem resulted not only in poor relations between the above mentioned states, but became one of the primary reasons for not creating any defensive alliance of the Baltic countries (as well as Finland and Poland) which could radically change the development of consecutive events in this region at the end of the 1930s and 1940. In comparison with other possible members of the Alliance of the Baltic States, Latvia’s attitude expressed towards the conflict between Poland and Lithuania differed to a great extent. To a certain extent it could be explained by the fact that Latvia bordered both with Lithuania and Poland. It was a highly complicated task, taking into account that maintaining good-neighbourly relations with Lithuania and Poland was one of the main objectives set by the Latvian diplomacy.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Florin Anghel, Construirea sistemului „Cordon Sanitaire”. Relaţii româno-polone, 1919-1926, Cluj-Napoca, 2003


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 77-79
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: REVIEW: The relationship between Romania and Poland, two countries situated in the in-between Europe sharing in the 1920s many common aims and security concerns, has received in the Romanian historian Florin Anghel dissertation, recently published by Nereamia Napocae Publishing House, a much needed monograph concerning the period from the inception of the diplomatic relations in 1919 to the Treaty of Guarantee concluded between the two states in 1926.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Poland, Finland and Romania. Cooperation and Parallelisms up to 1920’s


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 17-26
No. of Pages: 10
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The area situated between Finland and Romania cooperation among nations emerged already during the Middle Ages. The bonds strengthened during the Modern Age, although for most of the time only bilateral Finnish – Polish or Polish – Romanian cooperation existed. Nevertheless, during the interbellum Finnish – Polish – Romanian parallels and tripartite cooperation also started to be manifest, which is the focus of this article.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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The Proclamation of Romania’s Neutrality (September 1939) and its effects on the Romanian-Polish relations


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 115-128
No. of Pages: 14
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This article approaches the effects of the abrupt diplomatic changes of 1939 upon the relations between two East-Central European mid-sized nations, Poland and Romania, and upon their international behaviour. Allies starting with 1921 but choosing a different foreign policy line in the 1930s, the two countries were deeply affected by the August 1939 German-Soviet Pact which destroyed the European equilibrium. Realist and humanitarian, the Romanian foreign policy opted for neutrality when the German-Polish war broke out, but helped the Polish as much as the rules of neutrality allowed it. Because the Romanian- Polish alliance did not ask for more and Romania could not do more in 1939, this was the best Polish could realistically ask from the Romanian Kingdom.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Ideological basis of Polish citizens resettlement from the Eastern Borderlands in the years 1944-1946


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 95-118
No. of Pages: 24
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: As an outcome of World War II, Polish borders shifted dramatically. Poland lost the Eastern Borderlands, which had been incorporated into Byelorussian SSR, Lithuanian SSR and Ukrainian SSR. As compensation, the Polish state was granted the area of so-called “Recovered Territories”. In September 1944, agreements of mutual evacuation of citizens were signed between Poland and BSSR, LSSR and USSR governments. To fully understand the phenomenon of repatriations, three important questions should be posed. Firstly, terminology should be reconsidered, especially as the notion of ‘repatriation’ causes numerous problems; it is not clear whether it was an voluntary evacuation or resettlement forced by Soviet authorities. Secondly, the question of the context is to be raised, to what extent repatriation was part of Joseph Stalin’s plan to create monoethnic nation-states in Eastern Europe? Stalin’s program of homonational states and its compatibility with the Marxist-Leninist internationalist ideology is to be evaluated. Finally, the analysis will also include the ideological discourse used by the Polish Communist authorities to justify the loss of the Eastern Borderlands. How did the Polish Workers’ Party explain the necessity of repatriation from lands behind the Curzon Line and how did it use Stalin’s idea of monoethnic state to legitimate its authority in Poland? The study is based on archival documents as well as on recent historiographical works.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Considerations regarding Romania’s consulates in Poland in the interwar period


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 122-135
No. of Pages: 14
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: In the current study, I analyze a topic less approached by Romanian researchers so far, such as the organization of the consular network of Romania in Poland between the two World Wars. I have chosen this topic as a result of my preoccupation with the analysis of the way in which the diplomatic missions and consular offices of Romania were organized and run in the interwar period. I start from the premise that a better knowledge of the institutional architecture of the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and of the diplomatic and consular missions can help better our understanding of the way in which the Romanian diplomacy acted between the two World Wars. In the present case, the investigation on the foundation, functioning and dissolution of Romania’s career and honorary consulates on the territory of Poland represents an indicator that captures, from this angle, the complexity of the relations between the two neighbouring states. I am not only interested in the political, economic or cultural elements of the functioning of the Romanian consular network in Poland, but also in the human factor. We are interested in seeing, for instance, who the Romanian career consuls were (Warsaw, Lwów), as well as those who guaranteed the honorary consulates of Romania (Łódź, Wilno, Katowice etc.) and their relations to the diplomatic mission of Romania in Warsaw.
Open access on CEEOL: NOT YET



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