lawfare

Lawfare: The Use of International Law, Diplomacy and Propaganda by the Soviet Union during the Korean War


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 163-188
No. of Pages: 26
Keywords: , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The Soviet Union proves the perfect case study to demonstrate the use of propaganda as a supplement to political and military objectives. Though not noted for upholding treaties and adhering to rules, the Soviet government was expert at using law to manipulate the international legal system in its favor. This form of lawfare was used to manipulate and exploit the international legal system to supplement military and political objectives to control other states legally, politically and equally as important, through the public media of propaganda. Nowhere was this more apparent than the Korean War. As we see by the rhetoric both at home and abroad, through international political bodies and public propaganda, the Soviet Union worked exhaustively to place the face of the aggressor on the United States. By utilizing both the definition proposed for the state by earlier treaties and that proposed for the individual at Nuremberg, the Soviet Union again and again placed the terms of aggression and aggressive war onto the world stage to undermine the actions of a major opponent, the United States. Phrases such as intervention into the internal affairs of another country, action in disregard of the obligations of the United States to the UN, invasion by armed naval and air forces, and planning, preparing and carrying out hostile acts, were repeated often by the Soviet Union to clearly place the United States in violation of the definition of aggression, even if it was not a strictly legal one.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Christi Scott Bartman, Lawfare. Use of the Definition of Aggressive War by the Soviet and Russian Federation Governments


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 295-296
No. of Pages: 2
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The book contains a number of 384 letters of which, as the author confesses, the titles from the beginning and the end of the epistles are missing, titles which would have given more value to the book. One can find in this book letters to the members of the Hohenzollern family members, especially to his father, Karl Anton (until 1885 when the latter died), to his sister Mary of Flanders (until her death in 1912), to his brothers Friedrich (passed away in 1904) and Leopold (dead in 1905), and also to the Queen Elisabeth.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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