Eastern Europe

Sharing Feudalism with the East? Considerations on the feudal system in the West and East of Europe


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 3-9
No. of Pages: 7
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This paper challenges the view that Eastern Europe has not acknowledged a feudal society such as that prevailing in Western Europe.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Introduction


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 5-7
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Two concepts have been brought forth and approached from different perspectives and angles in this issue of Valahian Journal of Historical Studies: Eastern Europe and the frontier. Throughout its history, the area known during the Cold War under the name of Eastern Europe has been indeed a frontier area, a peripheral region of confluence between Europe, European Russia, the Middle East and Northern Africa. Known as Central Europe, East-Central Europe, in-between Europe , the designation of the region changed following the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact and the imposition of the Soviet yoke to Eastern Europe. Moreover, the perceptions of the political geographers, historians, journalists, politicians in Western Europe and the United States depicted a region totally subjugated to Soviet Union with no will or possibility to pursue even a limited national program beyond the strict limits Moscow was imposing to this region.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Constructing Easternness and settling new frontiers in Europe: again about the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 27-44
No. of Pages: 18
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The article aims at challenging the opinions overemphasizing the role of Yalta in constructing “Eastern Europe” in the way the public knew it after 1945/1948. This paper traces the roots of this mental and political construction back to 1939 and to the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact concluded on August 23rd. This paper is also searching for an answer to some questions regarding the constraints and opportunities facing the minor powers in a world dominated by great powers (be they clashing or cooperating with each other).
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Canada’s relations with the U.S.S.R. and its satellites in a divided world


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 83-94
No. of Pages: 12
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The political changes in the postwar world, characterized mainly by the lack of trust and diplomatic tensions were framing a new context for Canada’s relations with the new communist bloc. A fresh start, leading the way for new developments, occurred at the end of the World War II and was characterized by the world dominance of the two superpowers: U.S.A. and the Soviet Union. In terms of bipolar world and of U.S. proximity, Canada has promoted a foreign policy pattern characterized by prudence, patience, compromise and flexibility. On the other hand, the Eastern European states’ foreign policy, at least in the early postwar years, has proven the strong imprint of Moscow’s policy. From this perspective, Canada and Eastern Europe, lacking resources and opportunities to initiate and support their views on major international issues, developed a foreign policy of response to the actions of superpowers, trying to reduce East–West tensions.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Russian-East European Relations: from Tsarism to Gazprom. Conference in Cork, Ireland, May 2012


Language: English
Subject(s): Review
Page Range: 129-130
No. of Pages: 2
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Relations between Russia and its East European neighbors had always been a complex issue, in which media and policy-makers usually express a wide variety of opinions ranging from appeals for friendship and cooperation to warnings of domination and security threats. Recently, these relations have been subjected to a constructive academic debate in the Irish city of Cork, during an international conference organized by the Irish Association for Russian, Central and East European Studies and University College of Cork. The conference brought together both young researchers and senior scholars from numerous countries, especially from Central and East European institutions, and debates focused on Russia’s policies in this regions of Europe, especially in the 20th century and after. A solid input of historical background from different case studies provided for an in-depth analysis on the issues debated.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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