conflict

Olli Vehvilainen, Finland in the Second World War. Between Germany and Russia, (translated by Gerard McAlester), Palgrave, 2002


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 123-125
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The book signed by the well-known Finnish historian Olli Vehvilainen, a distinguished professor at the University of Tampere, is a new introspection into the history of the Europe in-between. The timeframe covered by the book, the Second World War, and the fate of Finland during this meaningful period in the history of the mankind invites us to a reflection of how the region’s history has been shaped and re-shaped by the general European and World developments.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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The attitude of Latvia towards the Vilnius question in the Twenties and Thirties of the 20th century


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 51-57
No. of Pages: 7
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The problem of the state affiliation of Vilnius and Vilnius region during the period between the World War I and World War II was the main reason causing discordance between Lithuania and Poland and not allowing these neighbouring states to develop normal relations. This problem resulted not only in poor relations between the above mentioned states, but became one of the primary reasons for not creating any defensive alliance of the Baltic countries (as well as Finland and Poland) which could radically change the development of consecutive events in this region at the end of the 1930s and 1940. In comparison with other possible members of the Alliance of the Baltic States, Latvia’s attitude expressed towards the conflict between Poland and Lithuania differed to a great extent. To a certain extent it could be explained by the fact that Latvia bordered both with Lithuania and Poland. It was a highly complicated task, taking into account that maintaining good-neighbourly relations with Lithuania and Poland was one of the main objectives set by the Latvian diplomacy.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Introduction


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 5-6
No. of Pages: 2
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Valahian Journal of Historical Studies recalls in these issues some of the challenges this region have come across with during the 20th and the beginning of 21st centuries: ethnic and territorial disputes, ideological subordination and underdevelopment, control over its own geo-strategic resources exerted by the great powers.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Beyond the superpower conflict: Introduction to VJHS special issue on cultural exchanges during the Cold War


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 5-14
No. of Pages: 10
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Research on Cold War has often been considered to a separate research paradigm and has thus been given the same of Cold War Studies. There are journals, research centers and institutions in the western countries many of which were born already during the Cold War. The Cold War was a western paradigm that was partly adopted in the socialist countries during the Cold War, but mainly as a concept outside scholarly research. Cold War studies used to be very political by nature, concentrating on international politics, high-level diplomacy and military affairs. But since the end of the Cold War, drastic changes have taken place in the field. Culture and social approaches that were hardly even in the margins within the Cold War studies have quickly transformed the whole field. One of the important factors for this was the opening of borders and access to primary sources that had remained closed for most researchers throughout the Cold War. This change is well reflected in the articles of this volume.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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The Culture of War. From the Sources of War to the Concept of War


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 6-24
No. of Pages: 19
Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The incentive for this paper is the lack of a clear distinction between war and crime. This implies that a profound theoretically defined concept of war is necessary in order for war to be definitely differed from crime. The author maintains that the culture of war is necessary way to separate the war from crime. In order to associate culture to war, one is supposed to find out a denominator which they share in common. The common denominator of culture and politics (security, war etc.) is land/territory/soil. An etymological analysis is provided in order to support the premise. Culture etymologically means the cultivation of land. Politics, originally meaning the ‘wall’, is the fencing and distribution of land, and therefore the struggle for land. This implies that politics (including war) is just a special form of culture. The war is to be cultivated in order to prevent its deviation into a crime. Paper provides the historical account of culture of land distribution. The account includes the cases of ancient Greece’s deme, ancient Rome’s ager publicus, Byzantine’s pronia system, Ottomans’ timar system, etc. The author starts his analysis of the war with the sources of war: conflict relationship, aggressiveness and security. The culture of war asserts to begin from the sources of war. This view finds strong support in Aristotle’s concept of the virtue of courage which is defined by fear. The novelty of this paper is the author’s concept of the culture of fear which is to replace currently ruling culture of unlimited courage as the cause of crime. The culture of fear is the most appropriate device thwarting the deviation of war into a crime. Article concludes with the concept of war, also relied on Aristotle’s view, which is defined by its purpose – peace.
Open access on CEEOL: NOT YET



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