Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 136-148
No. of Pages: 13
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The current paper would be a constructivist effort to interpret whether or not Lloyd George and Winston Churchill’s press appearances in the inter-war years were influential in determining the course of the British appeasement policy towards Germany. The topic has not yet been specifically approached from the perspective of newspaper articles published by the two wartime British Prime Ministers. The influence of the written press on public opinion and, in turn, the latter’s influence on Britain’s appeasement policy makers speaks on behalf of research which aims to better assess the sources of Britain’s appeasement of Nazi Germany. Britain’s written press was no foreign matter to David Lloyd George or to Winston Churchill before their descending to 10 Downing Street. Lloyd George’s interest for newspapers grew since his youth and he came to write a large number of newspaper articles. Churchill firmly opposed appeasement on both political and editorial grounds, being a renowned reporter since his Great War correspondent years. The subject was approached by reference to previous research works of biographers and historians. The research then revolves around the press articles and the speeches of the two politicians, reported in the British local newspapers, found through the British Newspaper Archive. It would be fair to conclude that David Lloyd George relied on newspapers to support the appeasement policy, while Winston Churchill’s articles and his famous speeches are a proof of his warnings about appeasement dangers. Their editorial works marked Britain’s inter-war history and its appeasement policy.
Open access on CEEOL: NOT YET



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