Issue No. 15 (2011)


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 7-9
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: ,
Summary/Abstract: Today, the flow of emigration is mainly from the developing to the developed countries (South – North migration). In this context notions such as brain drain have been invented in order to encompass the situation of the developing countries that lose skilled working force to the developed nations. Inside the developed nations, too, there are strong complains against immigration which, as the argument goes, affects the traditional values and wellbeing of society. The internal migration, too, is often accused of hindering the development of underdeveloped areas to the advantage of the better-off big cities. In the past, too, the internal migration was driven by the advent of modernity, industrialization, transport revolution, nationalism, ideologies, environment, world wars and world tourism.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 11-41
No. of Pages: 31
Keywords: , , , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: From the 1640s to the 1840s political thinkers and political activists discussed and struggled for three concepts of freedom: the right of the individual to be free from too much government oppression, the right to play an active role in politics to make the government responsible to the people, and the right to expect the state to help the poor to escape from economic oppression. These debates occurred throughout these two hundred years but this article discusses each in turn. The first struggle, to secure the individual’s possessions, freedom of religion and expression, and the right to resist tyranny by force, was advanced in theory and in practice by John Locke and radical Whigs in the seventeenth century and was the most successful campaign. The second campaign to make the government accountable to the people by giving all men and all women the right to elect the members of the legislature in the Westminster Parliament was advanced successfully in theory by the earlier nineteenth century, but it was not achieved in practice for more than a century after that. The campaign to free the poor from poverty and economic oppression was much debated in theory, especially during the early decades of the Industrial Revolution, but the utopian Socialists who advanced the most radical ideas did not really appreciate how to overcome the poverty and economic oppression of the working classes in a capitalist economy. It took a series of changes well into the later twentieth century before most British workers were lifted out of poverty.
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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 43-64
No. of Pages: 22
Keywords: , , , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The article focuses on the immigration policy of Scandinavian right-wing populist parties. A comparative analysis is made of the official platforms of the Danish Peoples Party, the Progress Party (Norway), the Sweden Democrats and the True Finns, the research aim being to find out what is common and what is special in the programs, and why this is the case. Examining the topic as a whole, it can be concluded that the immigration policies of Nordic right-wing populist parties differ from each other relatively little. The similarity between Scandinavian societies, also in the immigration situation, has also likely been guiding the political parties examined here towards quite similar immigration policy programs.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 65-82
No. of Pages: 18
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This paper investigates the role of the Nansen office in the hugely difficult task of repatriating the POWs from a Russia marred by the immense destructions caused by the Great War, the Civil War and the Bolshevik regime. The article focuses on the safeguarding of the life of at least 18,000 Romanians by the Nansen office, especially through the Baltic Sea “avenue”. The wavering relations between the Nansen office and the Romanian Government that has refused to allow the opening of a new salvation route for the POWs through the Danube and has postponed for long the application for funds thus creating big troubles to the former is also approached. The article concludes that the survivors of this ordeal may have been taught the best lessen about multi-ethnicity, tolerance, compassion and humanitarianism.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 83-94
No. of Pages: 12
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The minority issue represented the only ,,dark spot” on the agenda of bilateral relations between Athens and Bucharest during the interwar decades. This paper assesses this contntious issue, mainly concerning the Macedo-Romanians. One apparent solution to ethnic tensions of the period was the voluntary ,,in corpore” migration of some communities of Macedo-Romanians, which have left their native land and settled in Southern Dobroudja, during the interwar decades. This is placed a special emphasios on in this study. A special section of the study is dealing with the status of Greek community in Romania, in the light of new relevant archive documents. The authorities in Bucharest were constantly concerned with the situation of the Macedo-Romanian communities, a special role being played by Romania’s diplomatic representative in Athens, Constantin Langa Răşcanu, whose experience (and continuity) in the Balkans would eventually yield the expected results in the rapprochement between Romania and Greece. We have identified important moments, starting from the first years of the interwar decades (as well as the situation in the aftermath of the Second Balkan War) and going further to diplomatic statements about ethnic minority status by both parties. As a matter of fact, the Macedo-Romanian rights and their treatment by the Greek authorities, although less prominently, continued to be on the agenda of bilateral relations throughout the interwar period.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 95-118
No. of Pages: 24
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: As an outcome of World War II, Polish borders shifted dramatically. Poland lost the Eastern Borderlands, which had been incorporated into Byelorussian SSR, Lithuanian SSR and Ukrainian SSR. As compensation, the Polish state was granted the area of so-called “Recovered Territories”. In September 1944, agreements of mutual evacuation of citizens were signed between Poland and BSSR, LSSR and USSR governments. To fully understand the phenomenon of repatriations, three important questions should be posed. Firstly, terminology should be reconsidered, especially as the notion of ‘repatriation’ causes numerous problems; it is not clear whether it was an voluntary evacuation or resettlement forced by Soviet authorities. Secondly, the question of the context is to be raised, to what extent repatriation was part of Joseph Stalin’s plan to create monoethnic nation-states in Eastern Europe? Stalin’s program of homonational states and its compatibility with the Marxist-Leninist internationalist ideology is to be evaluated. Finally, the analysis will also include the ideological discourse used by the Polish Communist authorities to justify the loss of the Eastern Borderlands. How did the Polish Workers’ Party explain the necessity of repatriation from lands behind the Curzon Line and how did it use Stalin’s idea of monoethnic state to legitimate its authority in Poland? The study is based on archival documents as well as on recent historiographical works.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 119-136
No. of Pages: 18
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The topic of Jewish emigration from Romania is intensely debated among historians. The way the Romanian communist leaders have understood and responded to the requests of facilitating the emigrations made by Israel, the reasons for which the Zionists were able to act despite the measures taken by the Romanian Communist (Workers) Party and the issue of Romanian Jews „repatriated from Israel ” are topics which will be examined in this study. The paper presents the activity of the Zionist movement from Romania, the policy of the Romanian Workers (Communist) Party and of the Hebrew Democratic Committee towards the Zionist movement and the emigration of the Jews until 1948 and after the proclamation of the state of Israel.
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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 137-160
No. of Pages: 24
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The study presents the first efforts for the establishment of the first secondary school for girls in the Habsburg Bucovina, the regulations governing its activity in 1898-1918 and the issues related to the educational process. The granting by the Ministry of Cults and Instruction of the right of publicity gave the students of this school the possibility to complete their studies by obtaining a maturity certificate, thus granting them access to higher education. The educational process in the Municipal Girls’ High School in Cernăuţi brought an important contribution to the development of the education system as a whole, to a higher cultural level of the population in Bucovina and to the awareness of the woman’s importance in the society.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: French
Subject(s): Politics / Political Sciences
Page Range: 161-178
No. of Pages: 18
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: When analyzing the practical details of electoral participation in the attempt to find reasons for a certain electoral behavior, one of the most significant approaches is the study of the dynamics of electoral participation. In Romania, the electoral participation has dropped dramatically during the past twenty years. In our opinion, the population’s refusal to express their vote, as well as the loss of support and trust in the politicians, constitute a serious threat to the quality of the Romanian democracy. This paper aims to analyze, within the wider framework of the study of the electoral participation at a national level, the specific case of Constantza, where important differences can be noticed regarding the voter participation rate, when compared to the figures at the national level. This study is based on official data, gathered from all the general and presidential elections held between 1992 and 2009 (calculated both at the national and at the regional level). Based on the analysis of these data, it concludes that, as far as Constantza is concerned, the population takes a great interest in the political matters, which contributes to maintaining a constant high rate of electoral participation, not only in the local elections, but also in the general and presidential ones.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): Review
Page Range: 179-181
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Except for some minor mistakes (Béla Kun was the éminence grise and commissar of the Hungarian left-wing government of 1919 but not the Prime Minister) the whole enterprise of the author is well documented and balanced, standing out as perhaps the best synthetic approach on Ionel Brătianu’s role in Romanian politics. One can only hope that a Romanian edition of the book is already in sight.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Language: English
Subject(s): Review
Page Range: 183-187
No. of Pages: 5
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The volume edited by Jager and Mitter is one of the most fascinating books one may have the chance to find in book stores these days, especially due to the topic approached, topic that concerns both an academic area of Cold War studies usually less investigated and also a geographical area of the world not usually associated with Cold War thinking. This most interesting collection of essays focuses on the social implications of the Cold War and gathers a large group of researchers from various cultural and scientific backgrounds and of various nationalities, as well.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Language: English
Subject(s): Review
Page Range: 189-191
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The book bearing the signature of Kari Alenius stands out as the most remarkable monograph analyzing the circumstances and the mental and legal framework behind the elevation of the status of minorities in Germany and its lands at the end of First World War and beginning of the interwar period. The soundness of methods, the fineness of analysis, the depth of research and the attention paid to details turns it into an example of excellence in research and a guide for future studies on similar topics.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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