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Issue No. 10 (2008) Archives – Valahian Journal of Historical Studies

Issue No. 10 (2008)


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 7-15
No. of Pages: 9
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The acquiring of the independence of the Finnish state and the aggrandizement of Romania (1917-1918) are part of the same process of nation and state-building which occurred during the last phase of the World War I when some of the main belligerents were weakened by the war and gradually capitulated while others emerged from the conflagration as winning powers. The previous nation-building process has also many parallels occurring predominantly over the latter half of the 19th century.
Although shaping their main cultural and domestic political patterns in a fairly different milieu, the fact remains that the two nations will soon find themselves caught in the middle of the same tussle of military giants that has characterized the World War II. The two countries reacted by trying to use to their best advantage this hopeless international environment, experiencing also a re-discovery of each other as two nations trashed to the history garbage by Hitler and Stalin, then to be resuscitated against each other by each of the two tyrants.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 17-26
No. of Pages: 10
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The area situated between Finland and Romania cooperation among nations emerged already during the Middle Ages. The bonds strengthened during the Modern Age, although for most of the time only bilateral Finnish – Polish or Polish – Romanian cooperation existed. Nevertheless, during the interbellum Finnish – Polish – Romanian parallels and tripartite cooperation also started to be manifest, which is the focus of this article.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 27-39
No. of Pages: 13
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: As soon as the war had broken, Great Britain priorities and actions changed. Great Britain was in conflict with Germany in an era of total war and these reasons made London refuse the transformation of the Soviet Union into a new opponent and obviously into an outspoken ally of Hitler’s Germany, even at the risk of scarifying Romania and Finland. This article analyses the reasons behind British policy regarding these states at the end of 1939.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 41-55
No. of Pages: 15
Keywords: , , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This article investigates comparatively the roads of Romania and Finland to their September 1944 armistices with Soviet Union and their bilateral relations during these dramatic months. It also seeks to compare the two armistices and to explain the slightly different situations in which the two countries found themselves at the end of the war and especially after the armistices. An answer to the question whether the Romanian armistice has influenced in any way the Finnish decision-making for withdrawing from the war is also given.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 57-74
No. of Pages: 18
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: In the 1960s the West-East relations entered on the road of relaxation and détente. This is the context that permitted the organizing and opening of the CSCE. This is also the context that witnessed the foreign policy reorientation in Finland and Romania, later in Finland, earlier in Romania. Finland’s attitude towards the idea of opening a European security conference changed in time, while Romania had a clear position in supporting the CSCE quite from the beginning. This paper will summarize, comparatively, Romania and Finland’s doctrines of foreign policy for the period 1964-1973, interested in identifying and analyzing the foreign policy doctrines of Romania and Finland in the context of the CSCE preparation, the main question of the study being “what is the relations between Romania and Finland’s foreign policy doctrines and the opening of the CSCE”.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): Customs / Folklore
Page Range: 75-85
No. of Pages: 11
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This paper examines how tradition and history are being used in the tourism industry in general and especially how the Middle Ages have become a trend in tourism. As examples in this paper are the Finnish city of Turku, and how it uses the Middle Ages in its tourism, and the Dracula tourism in Romania. This paper also examines how places and tourist sights function as narrative spaces, how a castle or a ruin for example is just silent objects without the complementing narrative. This paper also focuses on the idea and concept of authenticity and its use in tourism as well as the idea of tourist sights as narrative places.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 87-98
No. of Pages: 10
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This article approaches the role of Finland in the fascinating world of espionage and intelligence of the 20th century. The importance of this country as a “black market” of intelligence during the inter-war period, the World War II and the Cold War is investigated in the light of the published literature and archival documents. During the Cold War, Finland exceeded her overall international importance in regard to intelligence and espionage, famous world secret services being very active in this country, such as the KGB, CIA, STASI, to quote only a few. Gradually, Finland is coming to terms with this concealed part of her history.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 99-100
No. of Pages: 2
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: It is rare that a historian has the chance to have in his hands a document of such value for his research. It took decades to get Raoul Bossy, Notti Constantinide and George Duca’s diaries or testimonies published. And many other former Romanian diplomats had not the time or the opportunity to record or publish their vision about a part of Europe which is still mysterious to many Romanians. In Ambassador Neagu Udroiu’s case, his testimony is not only a treasure of information, but it is also fascinating and overwhelming. And this is not only because of its size of 846 pages. It is fascinating for the rare qualities of narrator of the author and for the profound knowledge of the North which emanates from the whole book. It is overwhelming because it provides the historian with the rare opportunity to find out what is beyond the material factors of history, it discloses thoughts, believes, assumptions, perceptions, feelings… By doing so, it grants the analyst the chance to more roundly assess what stays behind certain decisions of foreign policy, the more so as the brief diplomatic reports of nowadays are not comparable with the value and size of their interwar or World War II counterparts.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 101-103
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This book represents a new version of Raoul Bossy’s pioneering work Finnish testimonies about the Romanians published in 1937, to which two other testimonies are added. The book is structured in 159 pages, where one finds aspects of the Romanian history and society of the 19th century, written by Finnish officers who had taken part within the Russian army in innumerable wars against the Ottoman Empire, many of them carried on the Romanian territory.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 105-106
No. of Pages: 2
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The years following the disruption of the Iron Curtain and the reunification of Europe have been propitious for investigating and sorting out the commonalities of the European nations, especially of those which for so long have been virtually separated from each other. This is also the case of Finland and Romania, countries which have continued a certain degree of relations at state level but very little at lower levels. This window of opportunity has provided also the study of the Finnish – Romanian relations with the tools for more thoroughly study of their past. Within this frame I would set the publication of the volume dedicated to the Finnish – Romanian confluences.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): Cultural history
Page Range: 107-109
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , ,
Summary/Abstract: The present work is Frederik Doeser’s academic dissertation for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science at Stockholm University, publicly defended in June 2008. The purpose of the study, as the author affirms in the introduction, was to explain the evolution of the foreign policy of Denmark, Finland and Sweden with regard to western security cooperation between 1988 and 1993. The study analyzes the foreign policy change in these three states at the end of the Cold War with regard to the ongoing security cooperation within the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Western European Union and to the proposal for security cooperation within the European Community and the emerging European Union.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 111-114
No. of Pages: 4
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This book gathers the contributions to the Conference “1945-Return to normalcy or a new beginning – concepts and expectations for a post war Europe around 1945”, hosted by Copenhagen Business School in 2006. The contributions show the changes underwent by different European states after the turning point that the year 1945 has represented in Europe’s history. The main dilemma that European countries were facing was whether after 1945 Europe would relapse into national isolationism or new ways of trans-national cooperation will evolve. An important unifying element for the European countries after the Second World War was their efforts for economic reconstruction. These efforts had the support of the US who realized that its welfare was depending on Europe’s economic stability. If most of the analysts of the post-war period tended to emphasize the US’s role in European economic reconstruction, Patricia Clavin signals the role played by European institutions like the League of Nations which laid the basis for European economic planning that played an essential role for the economic reconstruction in the post war time.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 115-117
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: One of the new approaches in the Cold War studies is the importance given to the role of ideology and culture in analyzing the decision-making process, the term ideology being largely interpreted, not only in the sense of political ideology, but also in the sense of perceptions of threats, selection of friends, evaluation of opportunities, historical memories, “ideas, norms and values”, “world view”, what people think or what meaning people gave to different things. Leffler’s book is a part of the new Cold War history, bringing new data from the Soviet and American archives and in the same time a new and fresh approach and interpretation.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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