Issue No. 03-04 (2005)


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 3-9
No. of Pages: 7
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This paper challenges the view that Eastern Europe has not acknowledged a feudal society such as that prevailing in Western Europe.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 11-22
No. of Pages: 12
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Political Russia was a superposed structure of Russian society which posed as the latter for at least two centuries, and which modelled itself following European standards, but without creating connections with its legitimizing source. To justify its expansionist claims, the tsarist empire invoked the Byzantine legacy which it was entitled to in its opinion, especially under the circumstances of the power void in eastern European space. This first approach of the relation with Europe, where Russia claimed its position, aroused different reactions in the Russian population: integrating ones on the part of the elite that wished to embrace the European civilization heritage, and rejection at the social level, where European values were difficult to grasp due to the incipient stage of political awareness in the Russian masses.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 23-35
No. of Pages: 13
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: Maybe Finland is the clearest example that nations are not born. People have the same nationality only and only if they share the same culture, especially if they recognize one another as belonging to the same community, to the same nation. This article approaches the way in which an idea spreads through literature to the people, contributing to the “birth” of the Finnish nation.
Open access on CEEOL: YES



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Language: French
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 37-49
No. of Pages: 13
Keywords: , ,
Summary/Abstract: A space traditionally marred by conflicts, the Balkans reacted at first by cooperation to the world depression and the advace of the extreme right-wing ideology. The Balkan Conferences are an interesting and challenging development to the bad reputation of the Balkans.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 51-57
No. of Pages: 7
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The problem of the state affiliation of Vilnius and Vilnius region during the period between the World War I and World War II was the main reason causing discordance between Lithuania and Poland and not allowing these neighbouring states to develop normal relations. This problem resulted not only in poor relations between the above mentioned states, but became one of the primary reasons for not creating any defensive alliance of the Baltic countries (as well as Finland and Poland) which could radically change the development of consecutive events in this region at the end of the 1930s and 1940. In comparison with other possible members of the Alliance of the Baltic States, Latvia’s attitude expressed towards the conflict between Poland and Lithuania differed to a great extent. To a certain extent it could be explained by the fact that Latvia bordered both with Lithuania and Poland. It was a highly complicated task, taking into account that maintaining good-neighbourly relations with Lithuania and Poland was one of the main objectives set by the Latvian diplomacy.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 59-66
No. of Pages: 8
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The Sanatist political regime – a political formula adequately to Poland’s political reality – was instituted by Jozef Pilsudski as a consequence of the political failures of the semi-democratic Polish governments of 1918 – 1926. This article approaches its main features and denies its characterization as a dictatorship.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 67-75
No. of Pages: 9
Keywords: , , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This paper approaches the Finnish and Romanian propaganda about the meaning of their war against Soviet Unions between 1941 and 1944. Parallels and differnces are found and concepts are discussed in this paper which is based on Romanian and Finnish archival documents.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 77-79
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: REVIEW: The relationship between Romania and Poland, two countries situated in the in-between Europe sharing in the 1920s many common aims and security concerns, has received in the Romanian historian Florin Anghel dissertation, recently published by Nereamia Napocae Publishing House, a much needed monograph concerning the period from the inception of the diplomatic relations in 1919 to the Treaty of Guarantee concluded between the two states in 1926.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 81-83
No. of Pages: 3
Keywords: , , ,
Summary/Abstract: REVIEW: Katalin Miklossy is a researcher at the University of Helsinki since 1998. Her field of research is the contemporary political history of East-Central Europe. Conceived as a doctoral thesis, her work is a confessed analysis of the phenomenon called by the 1990s media ‘the new nationalism’, a typical phenomenon for the post communist countries. Nationalism and the ‘present ethnic conflict’, Katalin Miklossy acknowledges, cannot be understood without the identification of the roots of this phenomenon, which, in her opinion, appeared in the middle of the socialist era on the basis laid by Romanian and Hungarian political leaders. The book is also an attempt to describe and analyze the impact of the Hungarians’ anti-Romanian attitude on the bilateral relations.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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