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Mihai Sandu, Author at Valahian Journal of Historical Studies

Mihai Sandu

The outlook of Romanian-Canadian diplomatic relations through international organizations


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 175-187
No. of Pages: 13
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: This article aims to show the outstanding role played by the international organizations in the early years of the Romanian-Canadian relations, especially in the diplomatic field but also in the economic and cultural ones. The two countries, placed after The Second World War in different ideological areas were in many occasions aware that they had many common interests on international policy. But to reach this level of proficiency Romania and Canada needed a number of tools that could be supported by the two superpowers. Therefore the international organizations became these tools and among them have distinguished the United Nations with its series of committees, bodies and programs, and the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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Canada’s relations with the U.S.S.R. and its satellites in a divided world


Language: English
Subject(s): History
Page Range: 83-94
No. of Pages: 12
Keywords: , , , ,
Summary/Abstract: The political changes in the postwar world, characterized mainly by the lack of trust and diplomatic tensions were framing a new context for Canada’s relations with the new communist bloc. A fresh start, leading the way for new developments, occurred at the end of the World War II and was characterized by the world dominance of the two superpowers: U.S.A. and the Soviet Union. In terms of bipolar world and of U.S. proximity, Canada has promoted a foreign policy pattern characterized by prudence, patience, compromise and flexibility. On the other hand, the Eastern European states’ foreign policy, at least in the early postwar years, has proven the strong imprint of Moscow’s policy. From this perspective, Canada and Eastern Europe, lacking resources and opportunities to initiate and support their views on major international issues, developed a foreign policy of response to the actions of superpowers, trying to reduce East–West tensions.
Open access on CEEOL: NO



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